password managers

Seven reasons to start using a password manager today

1) You aren’t alone

If you’re not sure what a password manager is, you’re not alone. And if you’re familiar with password managers but haven’t gotten around to using one, unfortunately you’re in the majority there, too.  

Good news — The Pack Has Your Back. Here’s the rundown! 

2) It’s easier than you think

Think of it as a diary where you’ve written all your secrets. But unlike any diary you kept as a kid, this one has a nearly impenetrable lock, and only you hold the key. In this case, the key is a strong, secure “master password.”  

Most people have weak passwords and use the same passwords on multiple sites and services. (And no, using the same password with a “1” after it does NOT count as a new password!) A password manager does the dirty work for you by generating random, strong passwords for all your logins, and storing them in one place that’s easy for you to access.

3) Less stuff to remember

With a password manager, you only have to remember that one master password. Period. Without a password manager, you have to remember dozens for all of your online accounts and services: phone and internet services, social media pages, banking sites, work and personal email accounts — everything these days requires a password!   

4) We’ve narrowed down the choices

LastPass is widely trusted and offers its best features — like a secure and searchable password “vault” where you can store all passwords, access on all devices, multi-factor authentication, and secure “notes” for files and information beyond just your passwords — for free.  

Other good options include 1Password, Dashlane or Keeper.

Some are free, some come with a small fee. Do your research and see which one best suits your needs. 

5) It’s safer than what you’re doing now

The obvious question people have about password managers is: what if that one master password gets hacked? Then the hacker would have access to all my online services and life as I know it would come to an end!   

Of course no security measure online or in real life is 100% infallible, but your “last password ever” is highly secure. It’s long, it’s complex, it’s got letters, numbers, and other characters that would be almost impossible to crack.   

It’s a lot safer than writing them down on a piece of paper or logging them away in a Google Doc, right? A password manager offers the best combination of security and convenience.

6) Who doesn’t like a good story?

What if I forget my master password? How to beat it: make your password into a story — a memorable phrase or a catchy song lyric.   

Many people don’t realize that a longer password is tougher to crack than a random one. So, for example (don’t use this one!) the password “afd%#T”, though complex and involving symbols as well as upper- and lower-case characters, would be easier to hack than something that tells a story, like “mydog8theblackcat@midnighT.” There are recognizable words in the second one, but it’s longer and therefore harder to crack.   

Make it personal to you.  

7) It’s free and quick

Go to LastPass.com (if that’s the one you choose), click the “Get LastPass Free” button, and enter your email, the master password, and an optional reminder. That’s the basic version. You can add services such as a GB of encrypted file storage and priority tech support if you pay a minor monthly fee.   

Then you just install the extension in your browser — it'll walk you through it, don’t worry — in order to capture and store passwords into its vault as you go about life online.   

It takes seconds. Okay, maybe a minute. But that’s really it!
   

If you want to learn more about how you can reduce your cyber risk at home and at work, contact Beauceron Security to learn more! info@beauceronsecurity.com 

Have you been pwned?

If you’ve ever wondered how exposed you are to hacking or how vulnerable your online presence might be, now you can find out in a matter of seconds.  

Here’s what you do: go to the site haveibeenpwned.com and input your email address. Hit enter. Moments later you’ll get either an all-clear saying “Good news – no pwnage found!” or an “Oh no – pwned!” message letting you know how many breached sites that email address has appeared on.  

More spam, more attacks

“Pwn” is an old gaming slang term derived from the verb “own.” According to the Wikipedia page, “pwn” “implies domination or humiliation of a rival, primarily in the internet-based video game culture to taunt an opponent who has just been soundly defeated (e.g., ‘You just got pwned!’).” 

Troy Hunt, a respected security researcher, created the website, which lets you check whether your email and/or passwords have been compromised, and which sites your information was leaked from.   

If you have appeared in any breaches, you will inevitably be getting more spam, and even targeted criminal attacks against you. It’s a good idea to check your work email and personal email against this cool tool to see how exposed you are.  

Hunt’s password service also allows you to securely check whether your passwords are in one of these data breaches. He has compiled a data set of 551 million passwords, and if you use passwords that appear here, you should change them immediately! 

How can you secure yourself?

The site suggests three steps to better security.  

1) Protect yourself using 1Password (or another reputable password manager such as LastPass) to create and save strong passwords for each site you use. Don’t use built-in browser password storage; Google Chrome, for example, will often ask, “Do you wish to remember the password for the site?” But it’s better to use a third-party password manager. It’s more secure and more convenient.  

2) Enable two-factor authentication

3) Subscribe to notifications for any other breaches on haveibeenpwned. This will keep you in the loop and informed on the status of your accounts and passwords. 

Remember: while this site is not a catch-all fix to any vulnerabilities in your online identity, it is a useful tool that can go a long way in boosting your overall security.